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  • Description: depression
(73 results)



Display: 20

    • Feeding Cleveland: Urban Agriculture photo gallery exhibit panels, May 2009

    • School gardens; Cleveland Public Schools Horticulture Program; Gardening; Agriculture; Laboratory schools; School children; Local foods; Urban agriculture; Exhibits; Thomas Campbell Gallery (Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs, Cleveland...
    • Facsimiles of 21 panels originally displayed in an exhibit titled, "Feeding Cleveland: Urban Agriculture." The 4-month long exhibit featured images from an online digital collection in Cleveland Memory, " Feeding Cleveland: Urban Agriculture," a...
    • Detroit Avenue - Memorial Park temporary housing

    • Lakewood (Ohio); Memorial Park Temporary Housing; Detroit Ave. (Lakewood, Ohio)
    • Few new homes had been built in Lakewood during the Depression and World War II. The post war years were times of difficult housing conditions as there was increased demand for homes by families that could now afford them. Lakewood's Memorial Park...
    • Detroit Avenue - Memorial Park temporary housing

    • Lakewood (Ohio); Memorial Park Temporary Housing
    • Few new homes had been built in Lakewood during the Depression and World War II. The post war years were times of difficult housing conditions as there was increased demand for homes by families that could now afford them. Lakewood's Memorial Park...
    • Fisherman's Shack

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • Fred Carlo (1914-1964) was born in the Roaring Third precinct. His talents were nurtured practically from the cradle. His mother was a gifted artist who taught ceramics at Karamu. Carlo became a fine jewelry maker, enamelist and ceramist, but is...
    • Little Joy

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists;
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Artist's Life #1

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • In a series of three prints Hughie Lee-Smith muses about the role of the artist in American society during the Depression. Should one stay in the studio creating lofty works of art and teaching, as the artist at the bottom does? Or should one join...
    • My Son My Son

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Native Son

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Neglected

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • Fred Carlo (1914-1964) was born in the Roaring Third precinct. His talents were nurtured practically from the cradle. His mother was a gifted artist who taught ceramics at Karamu. Carlo became a fine jewelry maker, enamelist and ceramist, but is...
    • Nobody Knows

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Poker Game

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Politics

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Frosted Roof Tops

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • Fred Carlo (1914-1964) was born in the Roaring Third precinct. His talents were nurtured practically from the cradle. His mother was a gifted artist who taught ceramics at Karamu. Carlo became a fine jewelry maker, enamelist and ceramist, but is...
    • Maybe Tomorrow

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Boy Seated

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • Zell (originally "Rozelle") Ingram (1910-1971) was born in Carrothersville, Ohio and came with his mother to Cleveland in 1922. A gifted child, he soon enrolled in art classes at Karamu House. Ingram went to East Technical High School. It appears...
    • Portrait

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...
    • Scrub Woman

    • Karamu House; Works Progress Administration (U.S.); African Americans; Artists
    • William E. Smith (1913-1997) moved to Cleveland from Chattanooga, Tennessee at the age of twelve after his mother’s death. During the early 1930s, he studied at the Playhouse Settlement of the Neighborhood Association of Cleveland (now called...

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